Change font size
It is currently Mon Dec 17, 2018 8:41 pm


Post a new topicPost a reply Page 24 of 27   [ 261 posts ]
Go to page Previous  1 ... 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 6:58 pm 
User avatar

Vehicle: MY08 XT (SH)

Posts: 1327
Location: Brisbane
My UHF radio has been held to the ceiling of the cubby below the HVAC controls with adhesive Velcro for a while on account of the difficulty of drilling holes in that space.

To sort it out properly I bought this right angle drill attachment ( https://www.bunnings.com.au/p-n-heavy-d ... t_p6320592 ):-

Image

(shown here with the bit-retaining spring removed. If you get the same item I recommend you do the same or it is very difficult to get your hex-based bits back out!)

As you can see, this makes access to the cubby ceiling much easier:-

Image


The radio mounting bracket had to come further forward than I would have liked so the knurled screws could be installed and removed beside one of the cubby walls and in front of the 12-volt outlet.

Image

Image

_________________
My build thread: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=54775


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:44 pm 
User avatar

Vehicle: MY08 XT (SH)

Posts: 1327
Location: Brisbane
The intercooler and throttle body still collect oil despite two catch cans:-

Image

This is a bucket of ethanol that has been washed through the intercooler, collecting yellow colouring and black oil on the way:-

Image

While the "clean side" of the crank case catch can is probably the main source of intercooler funk, the valve covers catch can arrangement was worth experimenting with for greater air-scrubbing efficiency.

The setup I've been running on the valve cover breathers for years is the Kapp quadruple-chamber catch can. Due to a manufacturing issue air can leak around the edges of the internal partitions. As such, my original setup was dictated by convenience with hoses. I ran the 16mm "dirty" hose off the valve breathers to the 16mm "out" hole then drew clean air from the adjacent 13mm "out hole". Internally, the dirty air was dumping in the top of the can, working around a large baffle then up the clean pipe.

It worked well enough, but it wasn't drawing the air through any steel wool and wasn't as efficient as it could be.

To increase the efficiency, I needed to neck down the 16mm hose coming off the valve cover breathers collector to a 13mm hose.

The lack of off-the-shelf 16mm to 13mm barbed adapters (and my lack of ebay-based forward planning) meant I had to assemble a 16mm to 13mm adapter from three brass BSP-threaded components. Fortunately I had some spare pre-bent OEM Subaru PCV-system hose that I could trim to fit and save the use of further angled adapters:-

Image

The new hose assembly is shown here snaking behind some OEM power steering (?) hoses (see nylon meshed hose):-

Image

I was keen to check the efficiency of the new setup without pulling everything apart, so I replaced the perfectly-functional 13mm "clean" fuel hose (running from the catch can to the pre-turbo intake pipe) with light duty clear vinyl 13mm hose. It wont last forever in the heat and oil fumes, but it's cheap and easy to replace. Due to the reduced flexibility of the vinyl hose, I needed to make a small riser off the catch can with a short length of 13mm fuel hose and a Bunnings plastic 13mm right-angle barbed adapter.

Image


The whole assembly is a bit less "sleeper stealth" than a black hose, but still almost invisible:-

Image

In the week after installation, the vinyl hose shows light condensation in it after driving and the "valve cover breathers" catch can drain contents is this:-

Image

Note the oil drops amongst the "yellow water" compared to earlier "yellow water only" drain jobs. In my view this is likely the extra filtering of the new routing scrubbing the air cleaner.

As you can see, the contents is still not as greasy as the "crank case" catch can drain from the same period shown below, but it's closer in appearance than with the old routing:-

Image

_________________
My build thread: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=54775


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:54 pm 
User avatar

Vehicle: MY11 S-Edition - SWP

Posts: 1129
Location: Sydney
I didn't know you could get a right angle drill attachment - now I do :) Good work.

_________________
2011 S-Edition SWP


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2018 9:50 pm 
User avatar

Vehicle: MY08 XT (SH)

Posts: 1327
Location: Brisbane
A few updates.

Firstly, the Turbosmart mechanical boost gauge on the steering column as detailed in the DIY thread ( viewtopic.php?f=29&t=58359 ):-

Image

----

Secondly, after reading a bit more about engine oils, the anti-wear properties of zinc (and the cat/emissions reasons why the latest specification oils have low zinc) I switched from Penrite GF5 5w30 to Penrite 10 TENTHS RACING 10W-40.

To quote the Penrite email account:-

Quote:
this oil is suitable with E85 applications, thicker to reduce the oil consumption also very high Zinc for anti-wear. https://www.penriteoil.com.au/applicati ... -pao-ester

---

When it comes to E85 use most vehicle will see the service life of the oil halved due to how the oil’s and fuel mix. We don’t see an issue at all running any of our Racing oils in daily driven vehicles on E85 however the decreased service interval need to be known if you are changing this every 5,000 or less that won’t be a problem at all.


My oil consumption is slightly down on before, but I've also changed my driving habits to keep the air-fuel ratio in stoich as much as possible for normal driving (only going "rich" when deliberately giving it a bit). This is partly a throttle control challenge for my own entertainment while commuting, but also to save fuel and reduce "cylinder wall washing with fuel" from going rich too often.

It's a very "night vs day" difference between stoich and rich with the Throttle Happy economy tune, since the car will lug along at (or slightly above/below) atmospheric manifold pressure at low revs until I push throttle pedal a bit further and it tips into boost/rich/fun.

---

The car had the "I" service a few weeks ago. Since the spark plugs were getting changed, I got John French Motors to do a compression and leak-down test. Results are as follows:-

Cyl 1 Compression 140, Leak-down 20%
Cyl 2 Compression 145, Leak-down 15%
Cyl 3 Compression 135, Leak-down 20%
Cyl 4 Compression 135, Leak-down 20%

Apparently that's normal range for an engine of this age (about 102,000kms) and the consistency across the cylinders is ok.

_________________
My build thread: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=54775


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2018 11:01 pm 
User avatar

I Say: There's no 'i' in Team, but there is in Winner!
Vehicle: MY10 XT

Posts: 1804
Location: Mealbun Orstraya
That's what I call grounds for a forged rebuild. The wife can not dispute solid evidence gathered from an independent source..


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2018 12:00 am 
User avatar

Vehicle: MY08 XT (SH)

Posts: 1327
Location: Brisbane
Yeah I'll check the money tree in relation to a rebuilt block :P

I would want to look into piston material anyway. Full-durability forged pistons seem to come with the penalty of slapping around in the bores a bit on cold start.

If the engine has a low risk of knock anyway (on E85) and isn't running crazy boost levels I would be keen to look at what low-expansion piston options there are for a built bottom-end. Perhaps even stock hypereutectic pistons in a factory-built STI bottom end might be a good value package for a street car if I needed a new bottom-end in a hurry at some point.

It's interesting watching the boost/vacuum gauge after a cold start (10-15 inches of mercury from memory) vs when the car has warmed up (18-20inHg), indicating that even the hypereutectic pistons need to heat up and expand a bit for maximum ring seal in the bore.

---

Here are the spark plugs that came out of it at the recent service. Probably 102,000kms old with the last 20,000kms on E85.

The numbers correspond with cylinder numbers. I'm not sure how much post-removal abrasion (as opposed to in-cylinder conditions)has caused some of the marks:-

Image

Image

Some of the colour difference between cylinders is interesting:-

Image

Image

Image

From a bit of browsing of "spark plug chart" web search results, I'm guessing this appearance is normal range. I would be interested to hear from anyone wish expertise/experience of such things.

_________________
My build thread: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=54775


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2018 12:30 am 
User avatar

Vehicle: MY08 XT (SH)

Posts: 1327
Location: Brisbane
Today I finally got around to replacing with silicone the temporary rubber vacuum lines (that had to replace some "swelled with oil" earlier vacuum lines).

The old "tape them together then pull through" trick worked again:-

Image


I deliberately went with two different colours for the "boost from compressor housing" and "boost to wastegate diaphragm" lines so it's easier to work out which is which hose coming off the 3-port boost controller the next time things need to be messed with.

Either that or I'm a closet ricer breaking out of the sham of "preferring the sleeper look".

Image

Image

_________________
My build thread: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=54775


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2018 12:54 am 
User avatar

Vehicle: MY08 XT (SH)

Posts: 1327
Location: Brisbane
One would think that me driving around would be "studley" enough, but for a bit extra I replaced the bolts holding the intercooler to the turbo with off-the-shelf M8 x 38mm studs from the Supercheap auto spinning tree of blister packs:-

Image


Not included in the pack were the two "normal height" (skinny for today's purposes) 13mm high tensile nuts for the bottom-side of the turbo flange (settle down!) or the stainless washers for between the top of the intercooler and the tall nuts:-

Image


Studs (rather than bolts) are necessary for ease of fitment, although you could chop the head off a bolt if you wanted.

The studs screw in from the top. I then added some red Loctite to the 13mm skinny nuts and put them under the turbo flange. The engine-side one is a bit of a pr!ck to do up. The crows-foot fitting was a bit helpful:-

Image


You end up with a good amount of thread sticking up from the turbo flange and ready for the oversized holes in the intercooler to drop onto:-

Image

The washers and tall nuts (12mm like the rest of the head-sizes in the area :D ) then go on.

Image


I did this because I'm removing and reinstalling my intercooler a lot, and I didn't like the idea of the aluminium threads in the turbo flange getting chewed out from regular use, incorrect torque, accidental cross-threading, etc.

In my opinion the studs make it a bit easier to locate the intercooler on the turbo when I'm doing up the throttle-hose side (or at least they are a different kind of annoyance).

The extra threads & steel holding it all together seems a lot stronger now for doing everything up. To be honest I wasn't totally happy with the 13mm skinny nuts' tendency to spin after a certain point of tightening the tall nut (with only the non-engine side reachable with a spanner at that point), so the alloy threads are under some stress rather than taking it easy in the middle of a steel sandwich like I intended.

However, if the studs just get to sit there "permanently" now, at least the wear & tear on the alloy threads will now be much reduced.

On un-doing you also need to be a bit more deliberate removing the washers and thick nuts (rather than just two bolts) because there are more small parts to drop now.

Overall however I'm pretty happy with the change.

Noting the "brass female thread recessed in plastic" in the manifold (for intercooler support bracket) and intercooler (for blowoff-valve mounting) I wouldn't rule out adding more studs in the correct sizes to give those brass threads a break.

_________________
My build thread: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=54775


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:16 pm 
User avatar

Vehicle: MY09 XT Premium

Posts: 130
Location: Melbourne
Those brass steel studs for the turbo outlet are genius! I need to do this to my VF52 soon, I may have slightly overtightened one of them slightly at one point...


Last edited by jacksoncollins on Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:25 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Yowie's SH turbo
PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:20 pm 
User avatar

Vehicle: MY08 XT (SH)

Posts: 1327
Location: Brisbane
Cheers.

Hopefully they keep working out as planned. Some locktite in the turbo flange threads might help too, but I'm being a p*ssy until the concept has proven itself more.

I suppose I could lock two normal nuts against each other then remove a loctited stud that way if needed.

(high tensile steel studs btw, I think brass would have its own issues under tension)

_________________
My build thread: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=54775


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post a new topicPost a reply Page 24 of 27   [ 261 posts ]
Go to page Previous  1 ... 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27  Next


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
"Takka LE" for phpBB3